God Sitting Upon His Throne (Facsimile 2, Figure 7)

Book of Abraham Insight #33

Figure 7 in Facsimile 2 is identified as follows: “Represents God sitting upon his throne, revealing through the heavens the grand Key-words of the Priesthood; as, also, the sign of the Holy Ghost unto Abraham, in the form of a dove.” Appearing in several other ancient Egyptian hypocephali,1 the sitting personage in Figure 7 has been described by one Egyptologist as “a polymorphic god sitting on his throne” with “the back of him is bird-form, while one of his arms is raised [in] the attribution” of the gods Min or Amun “and hold[ing] forth a flagellum.” Standing next to him is a “falcon- or snake-headed snake” believed to perhaps be the minor deity Nehebkau, who “offers the wedjat-eye.”2

Another Egyptologist has similarly described this figure as “a seated ithyphallic god with a hawk’s tail, holding aloft a flail. This is a form of Min . . . perhaps combined with Horus, as the hawk’s tail would seem to indicate. Before the god is what appears to be a bird presenting him with a Wedjat-eye.”3 In some hypocephali the ancient Egyptians themselves simply identified this figure as, variously, the “Great God” (nṯr ˁȝ), the “Lord of Life” (nb ˁnḫ), or the “Lord of All” (nb r ḏr).4 This first epithet is significant for Joseph Smith’s interpretation, since in one ancient Egyptian text the divine figure Iaho Sabaoth (Lord of Hosts) is also afforded the epithet “the Great God” (pȝ nṯr ˁȝ).5

Since some Egyptologists have suggested this figure is the god Min or Amun, who was often syncretized with Min,6 it would be worth exploring what we know about this deity, even if this identification wasn’t explicitly made by the ancient Egyptians themselves. One of Egypt’s oldest gods, Min was worshipped as early as the Pre-Dynastic Period (circa pre-3000 BC). Although he assumed multiple attributes over millennia,7 Min is perhaps best known as “the god of the regenerative, procreative forces of nature”8; that is, as a sort of fertility god who was often depicted as the premier manifestation of “male sexual potency.”9 He is frequently shown raising his arm to the square while holding a flail, symbols or gestures associated with kingship, displaying power, and the ability to protect from enemies.10

Min is also very often, though not always,11 depicted in hypocephali with an erect phallus (ithyphallic), which Egyptologists have interpreted as either a symbol of, on the one hand, sexual potency, fertility, (pro)creation, and rejuvenation, or, on the other hand, aggression, power, and potency.12 One Egyptologist has also interpreted depictions of Min with his raised arm and erect phallus as a sign of him being “a protector of the temple” whose role was to “repulse negative influences from the ‘profane surroundings’” of the sacred space of the temple.13

Worshipped extensively throughout Egypt, the god Min was represented in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional art. Image on the left: relief of Min at the Karnak temple via Wikipedia. Image on the right: a small wood amulet of Min from the Late Period–Ptolemaic Period (circa 664–30 B.C.) via the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

That Min would assume the roles of divine procreator who gives life and divine king who upholds the cosmos is understandable from the viewpoint of ancient Egyptian religion.14 As Ian Shaw explains,

Although Egyptian art shied away from depicting the sexual act, it had no such qualms about the depiction of the erect phallus. . . . The three oldest colossal religious statues in Egyptian history, found by [William Flinders] Petrie in the earliest strata of the temple of Min at Koptos . . . where essentially large ithyphallic representations, probably of Min. . . . This celebration of the phallus appears to be directly related to the Egyptians’ concerns with the creation (and sustaining) of the universe, in which the king was thought to play a significant role—which was no doubt one of the reasons why the Egyptian state would have been concerned to ensure that the ithyphallic figures continued to be important elements in many cults.15

Christina Riggs similarly comments that “near naked goddesses, gods with erections, and cults for virile animals, like bulls, make sense in [ancient Egyptian] religious imagery because they captured the miracle of life creating new life.”16 For this reason Min was “regarded as the creator god par excellence” in ancient Egypt, as fertility and (male) sexuality was “subsumed under the general notion of creativity.”17

Figure 7 in Facsimile 2 was either originally drawn or copied somewhat crudely (without access to the original it is impossible to tell), and so it is not entirely clear if the seated figure is ithyphallic or if he has one arm at his side with the other arm clearly raised in the air. Although Egyptologists have tended to interpret Figure 7 in Facsimile 2 as ithyphallic—and that seems to be how it is depicted—it should be kept in mind, as noted above (and seen below), that Min is not always depicted as such in hypocephali, so he need not necessarily be viewed as ithyphallic in Facsimile 2. In any case, there is nothing to suggest anything pornographic or sexually illicit in ancient ithyphallic depictions of Min.

But what about the figure assumed to be Nehebkau offering Min the Wedjat-eye?18 Depicted most commonly as a snake or snake-headed man19—but sometimes as a falcon (as in Facsimile 2)20—in Chapter 125 of the Book of the Dead, Nehebkau is named as one of the judges of the dead.21 In Chapter 149 of the Book of the Dead he is associated with Min and other deities as one who assures the dead will be rejuvenated and resurrected with a perfected body.22 In the Pyramid Texts he feeds the deceased king and acts as a divine messenger.23 As such, he “was considered to be a provider of life and nourishment.”24 Together Nehebkau and Min ”were symbolic of life-force and procreative forces of nature.”25

In different hypocephali the figure believed to be Nehebkau is depicted as either a snake (top) or a falcon (bottom) who is either presenting the Wedjat-eye to Min on his throne (top) or is receiving the Wedjat-eye from Min on his throne (bottom). Images from Mekis (2013), 92.

In ancient Egyptian, wḏȝ carries the meaning of “hale, uninjured,” and “well-being.”26 The word can describe the health or wholeness of the physical body, the soul, or moral character.27 The wḏȝt-eye Nehebkau presents to Min (or vice-versa) was envisioned by the ancient Egyptians as “whole” or “sound” eye of Horus and had an apotropaic function in ancient Egyptian religion.28 It was, in short, “the symbol of all good gifts”29 and a symbol for “the miracle of [the] restoration” and renewal of the body.30

This fuller understanding helps make sense of Joseph Smith’s interpretation of this figure and plausibly situates such it in an ancient Egyptian context.31

Further Reading

Hugh Nibley and Michael D. Rhodes, One Eternal Round, The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley: Volume 19 (Salt Lake City and Provo, UT: Deseret Book and FARMS, 2010), 304–322.

Michael D. Rhodes, “The Joseph Smith Hypocephalus…20 Years Later,” FARMS Preliminary Paper (1997).

Footnotes

 

1 Tamás Mekis, Hypocephali, PhD diss. (Eötvös Loránd University, 2013), 1:91–93.

2 Mekis, Hypocephali, 1:91.

3 Michael D. Rhodes, “The Joseph Smith Hypocephalus…20 Years Later,” FARMS Preliminary Paper (1997), 11.

4 John Gee, “Towards an Interpretation of Hypocephali,” in “Le Lotus Qui Sort de Terre”: Mélanges Offerts À Edith Varga, ed. Hedvig Győry (Budapest: Bulletin du Musée Hongrois des Beaux-Arts, 2001), 334; Mekis, Hypocephali, 1:91n484.

5 John Gee, “The Structure of Lamp Divination,” in Acts of the Seventh International Conference of Demotic Studies, Copenhagen, 23–27 August 1999, ed. Kim Ryholt (Copenhagen: The Carsten Neibuhr Institute of Near Eastern Studies, University of Copenhagen, 2002), 211–212.

6 Christian Leitz, ed., Lexikon der ägyptischen Götter und Götterbezeichnungen (Leuven: Peeters, 2002), 3:290–291.

7 Leitz, Lexikon der ägyptischen Götter und Götterbezeichnungen, 3:288–291.

8 Rhodes, “The Joseph Smith Hypocephalus…20 Years Later,” 11.

9 Eugene Romanosky, “Min,” in The Ancient Gods Speak: A Guide to Egyptian Religion, ed. Donald B. Redford (New York: Oxford University Press, 2002), 218.

10 Leitz, ed., Lexikon der ägyptischen Götter und Götterbezeichnungen, 3:288; Jorge Ogdon, “Some Notes on the Iconography of Min,” Bulletin of the Egyptological Seminar 7 (1985/6): 29–41; Romanosky, “Min,” 219; Toby A. H. Wilkinson, Early Dynastic Egypt (London: Routledge, 1999), 161; Manfred Lurker, An Illustrated Dictionary of the Gods and Symbols of Ancient Egypt (London: Thames and Hudson, 1980), 52. Richard H. Wilkinson, Symbol and Magic in Egyptian Art (London: Thames and Hudson, 1994), 196; cf. The Complete Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt (London: Thames and Hudson, 2003), 115; “Ancient Near Eastern Raised-Arm Figures and the Iconography of the Egyptian God Min,” Bulletin of the Egyptological Seminar 11 (1991–2): 109–118.

11 Mekis, Hypocephali, 1:92.

12 Ogdon, “Some Notes on the Iconography of Min,” 29–41; Joachim Quack, “The So-Called Pantheos: On Polymorphic Deities in Late Egyptian Religion,” in Aegyptus et Pannonia III: Acta Symposii anno 2004, ed. Hedvig Győry (Budapest: Comité de l’Égypte Ancienne de l’Association Amicale Hongroise-Égyptienne, 2006), 176.

13 Ogdon, “Some Notes on the Iconography of Min,” 33.

14 Min was often syncretized with both Horus and Amun, two gods closely associated with kingship, and himself bore the epithet “Min the King.” Leitz, Lexikon der ägyptischen Götter und Götterbezeichnungen, 3:290–291.

15 Ian Shaw, Ancient Egypt: A Very Short Introduction (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004), 133.

16 Christina Riggs, Ancient Egyptian Art and Architecture: A Very Short Introduction (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014), 89.

17 K. Van der Toorn, “Min,” in Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible, ed. Karel van der Toorn, Bob Becking, and Pieter W. van der Horst, 2nd ed. (Leiden: Brill, 1999), 557. This can be further seen in the Pyramid Texts, which explicitly links male sexual virility with the creation of the cosmos (in this case the birth of Shu and Tefnut from the primordial creator god Atum). PT 527 in James Allen, trans., The Ancient Egyptian Pyramid Texts, ed. Peter Der Manuelian (Atlanta, GA: Society of Biblical Literature, 2005), 164.

18 Alan W. Shorter, “The God Nehebkau,” The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 21, no. 1 (1935): 41–48; Richard H. Wilkinson, The Complete Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt (London: Thames and Hudson, 2003), 224–225.

19 Wilkinson, The Complete Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt, 224; Leitz, Lexikon der ägyptischen Götter und Götterbezeichnungen, 4:274.

20 Mekis, Hypocephali, 1:92n486; Leitz, Lexikon der ägyptischen Götter und Götterbezeichnungen, 4:274.

21 Raymond O. Faulkner, trans., The Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead (London: The British Museum Press, 2010), 32; Karl Richard Lepsius, Das Todtenbuch der Ägypter nach dem hieroglyphischen Papyrus in Turin mit einem Vorworte zum ersten Male Herausgegeben (Leipzig, Germany: G. Wigand, 1842), Pl. XLVII.

22 Faulkner, The Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, 137; Lepsius, Das Todtenbuch der Ägypter, Pl. LXXI.

23 PT 264, PT 609 in Allen, The Ancient Egyptian Pyramid Texts, 78, 230.

24 Rhodes, “The Joseph Smith Hypocephalus…20 Years Later,” 12.

25 Luca Miatello, “The Hypocephalus of Takerheb in Firenze and the Scheme of the Solar Cycle,” Studien zur Altägyptischen Kultur 37 (2008): 285.

26 Raymond O. Faulkner, A Concise Dictionary of Middle Egyptian (Oxford: Griffith Institute, 1962), 74–75.

27 Adolf Erman and Hermann Grapow, Wörterbuch der aegyptischen Sprache (Berlin: Akademie Verlag, 1958), 1:399–400.

28 Geraldine Pinch, Egyptian Mythology: A Guide to the Gods, Goddesses, and Traditions of Ancient Egypt (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2002), 131–132.

29 Rhodes, “The Joseph Smith Hypocephalus…20 Years Later,” 11.

30 Hugh Nibley and Michael D. Rhodes, One Eternal Round, The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley: Volume 19 (Salt Lake City and Provo, UT: Deseret Book and FARMS, 2010), 314.

31 See further Nibley and Rhodes, One Eternal Round, 304–322.

Los cuatro hijos de Horus (Facsímil 2, figura 6)

Libro de Abraham Perspectiva #32

La Figura 6 del Facsímil 2 del Libro de Abraham fue interpretada directamente por José Smith como "representando esta tierra en sus cuatro cuartos" 1. Basado en el uso contemporáneo de este lenguaje bíblico en el siglo XIX (Apocalipsis 20:8), José Smith claramente quiso decir que las figuras representan los cuatro puntos cardinales (norte, este, sur y oeste)2. Esta interpretación encuentra soporte inmediato de los antiguos egipcios. Las cuatro entidades en la Figura 6 representan a los cuatro hijos del dios Horus: Hapi, Amset, Duamutef y Kebeshenuef3. A lo largo de milenios de religión egipcia, estos dioses tomaron diferentes formas, así como papeles y aspectos mitológicos4. De hecho, una de esas funciones fue como representante de las cuatro direcciones cardinales. "En virtud de su asociación con las direcciones cardinales", observa un egiptólogo, "cuatro es el símbolo más común de ‘integridad‘ en el simbolismo numerológico egipcio y la repetición ritual"5. Como otro egiptólogo resumió:
La primera referencia a estos cuatro dioses se encuentra en los Textos de la Pirámide [ca. 2350–2100 a. C.], donde se dice que son los hijos y también las "almas" del [dios] Horus. También se les llama los "amigos del rey" y ayudan al monarca fallecido a ascender al cielo (PT 1278–79). Los mismos dioses también eran conocidos como los hijos de Osiris y más tarde se dijo que eran miembros del grupo llamado "los siete benditos", cuyo trabajo era proteger el ataúd del dios del inframundo. Su mitología de la vida después de la muerte condujo a papeles importantes en el ensamblaje funerario, particularmente en asociación con los recipientes ahora tradicionalmente llamados vasos canopos en los que se conservaban los órganos internos de los difuntos. . . . El grupo puede haberse basado en la integridad simbólica del número cuatro solamente, pero a menudo se les dan asociaciones geográficas y, por lo tanto, se convirtieron en una especie de grupo "regional". . . . Los cuatro dioses a veces se representaban a los lados del cofre canopo y tenían orientaciones simbólicas específicas, con Amset generalmente alineada con el sur, Hapi con el norte, Duamutef con el este y Qebehsenuf con el oeste6.
Este entendimiento se difunde ampliamente entre los egiptólogos de hoy. James P. Allen, en su traducción y comentario sobre los Textos de las Pirámides, simplemente identifica a los cuatro Hijos de Horus como "que representan las direcciones cardinales"7. Manfred Lurker explica que "cada uno [de los hijos de Horus] tenía una cabeza característica y estaba asociado con uno de los cuatro puntos cardinales de la brújula y una de las cuatro diosas ‘protectoras’" asociadas con ella8. Geraldine Pinch está de acuerdo, escribiendo: “[Los cuatro Hijos de Horus] eran los guardianes tradicionales de los cuatro vasos canopos utilizados para guardar los órganos momificados. Imsety generalmente protegía el hígado, Hapi los pulmones, Duamutef el estómago y Qebehsenuef los intestinos. Los cuatro hijos también se asociaron con las cuatro direcciones (sur, norte, este y oeste) y con los cuatro componentes vitales para la supervivencia después de la muerte: el corazón, el ba, el ka y la momia”9. “Eran los dioses de las cuatro partes de la tierra”, comenta Michael D. Rhodes, “y más tarde se llegó a considerar que presidían los cuatro puntos cardinales. También eran guardianes de las vísceras de los muertos, y sus imágenes estaban talladas en los cuatro vasos canopos en los que se colocaban los órganos internos”10.Otro egiptólogo, Maarten J. Raven, argumenta que el propósito principal de los Hijos de Horus era actuar como "las cuatro esquinas del universo y los cuatro soportes del cielo, y solo secundariamente con la protección de la integridad del cuerpo"11.La asociación de los Hijos de Horus con las direcciones cardinales de la tierra es explícita en una escena en la que, representados "como pájaros volando a las cuatro esquinas del cosmos", anuncian el ascenso al trono del rey Ramsés II12.
Amset, ve al sur para que puedas declarar a los dioses del sur que Horus, [hijo de] Isis y Osiris, ha asumido la corona y el Rey del Alto y Bajo Egipto, Usermaatre Setepenre [Ramesses II], ha asumido la corona; Hapi, ve al norte para que declares a los dioses del norte que Horus, [hijo de] Isis y Osiris, ha asumido la corona y el Rey del Alto y Bajo Egipto, Usermaatre Setepenre [Ramesses II], ha asumido la corona; Duamutef, ve al este para que puedas declarar a los dioses del este que Horus, [hijo de] Isis y Osiris, ha asumido la corona y el Rey del Alto y Bajo Egipto, Usermaatre Setepenre [Ramesses II], ha asumido la corona; Qebehsenuef, ve al oeste para que puedas declarar a los dioses del oeste que Horus, [hijo de] Isis y Horus, ha asumido la corona y el Rey del Alto y Bajo Egipto, Usermaatre Setepenes [Ramesses II], ha asumido la corona13 .
Si bien la sucinta interpretación de José Smith de la Figura 6 en Facsímil 2 podría haber dejado fuera algunos detalles adicionales que conocemos sobre los Hijos de Horus (roles que evolucionaron a lo largo de la historia religiosa egipcia). Sin embargo, converge muy bien con el conocimiento egiptológico actual14.

Otras lecturas

John Gee, “Notes on the Sons of Horus”, FARMS Report (1991). Hugh Nibley y Michael D. Rhodes, One Eternal Round (Salt Lake City y Provo, UT: Deseret Book y FARMS, 2010), 299–302.

Notas de pie de página

1 “A FAC-SIMILE FROM THE BOOK OF ABRAHAM, NO. 2.", Times and Seasons 3, no. 16 (15 de marzo de 1842): vea entre las págs. 720 y 721.

2 Así George Stanley Faber, A General and Connected View of the Prophecies, Relative to the Conversion, Restoration, Union, and Future Glory of the Houses of Judah and Israel (Londres: F. C. and J. Rivington, 1808), 2:84, énfasis en el original: "[N]o solamente desde el norte, sino … del este, el sur y el oeste, es decir (en el lenguaje de San Juan) de los cuatro cuartos de la tierra".; Robert Hodgson, The Works of the Right Reverend Beilby Porteus, D. D. Late Bishop of London (Londres: G. Sidney, 1811), 218: "Y reunirán a sus elegidos (es decir, reunirán discípulos y se convertirán a la fe) de los cuatro vientos, de los cuatro cuartos de la tierra; o, como lo expresa San Lucas, ‘del este y del oeste, del norte y del sur’".; Matthew Henry, An Exposition of the Old and New Testament (Londres: Joseph Ogle Robinson, 1828), 3:1415: "Como la ciudad tenía cuatro lados iguales, respondiendo a los cuatro cuartos del mundo, este, oeste, norte y sur; así en cada lado había tres puertas, lo que significa que de todos los cuartos de la tierra habrá algunos que se salvarán al cielo y serán recibidos allí, y que hay una entrada libre de una parte del mundo como de la otra".; Noah Webster, An American Dictionary of the English Language (Nueva York, NY: S. Converse, 1828), s.v. quarter: "Una región en el hemisferio o gran círculo; principalmente, uno de los cuatro puntos cardinales; como los cuatro cuartos del globo; pero se usa indiferentemente para cualquier región o punto de brújula".; William L. Roy, A New and Original Exposition on the Book of Revelation (Nueva York, NY: D. Fanshaw, 1848), 13, énfasis en el original. "De pie en (desde) los cuatro rincones de la tierra. Fueron colocados como centinelas sobre los ejércitos hostiles, allí para vigilar sus movimientos, y evitar que marcharan a Judea hasta que los siervos de Dios fueran sellados. Cada uno de ellos tenía asignada su posición y sus funciones determinadas. Uno estaba asignado en el este, el otro en el oeste, uno en el norte y el otro en el sur".; William Henry Scott, The Interpretation of the Apocalypse and Chief Prophetical Scriptures Connected With It (Londres: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1853), 185–186: "Se habla de Roma como invadiendo y subyugando a ‘toda la tierra‘, no solo en referencia a la vasta extensión de su imperio en el punto de territorio, o la multitud de reinos que ella absordió uno tras otro, sino de manera adecuada e inmediata porque las cuatro cuartas partes de la tierra, Norte, Este, Oeste y Sur, están todas incorporadas por Roma en sí misma".; Peter Canvan, “The Earth, As We Find It,” Saints ’Herald 20, no. 5 (1 de marzo de 1873): 139: “Y cuando los mil años se cumplan, Satanás será soltado de su prisión, y saldrá a engañar a las naciones que están en los cuatro ángulos de la tierra. . . . Las cuatro esquinas pueden estar representadas por el norte, sur, este, oeste, que son los puntos cardinales".

3 Michael D. Rhodes, “A Translation and Commentary of the Joseph Smith Hypocephalus”, BYU Studies 17, no. 3 (1977): 272–273; “The Joseph Smith Hypocephalus . . . Twenty Years Later,” FARMS Report (1997), 11; Tamás Mekis, Hypocephali, tesis doctoral. (Universidad Eötvös Loránd, 2013), 90, 96–97.

4 Para una visión general, véase John Gee, “Notes on the Sons of Horus”, FARMS Report (1991).

5 Robert K. Ritner, The Mechanics of Ancient Egyptian Magical Practice (Chicago, Ill.: Instituto Oriental, 1993), 162n750.

6 Richard H. Wilkinson, The Complete Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt (Londres: Thames y Hudson, 2003), pág. 88.

7 James P. Allen, trans., The Ancient Egyptian Pyramid Texts, ed. Peter Der Manuelian (Atlanta, GA: Sociedad de Literatura Bíblica, 2005), pág. 433.

8 Mafred Lurker, An Illustrated Dictionary of the Gods and Symbols of Ancient Egypt (Londres: Thames and Hudson, 1980), págs. 37–38.

9 Geraldine Pinch, Egyptian Mythology: A Guide to the Gods, Goddesses, and Traditions of Ancient Egypt (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2002), pág. 204.

10 Rhodes, “A Translation and Commentary of the Joseph Smith Hypocephalus”, págs. 272–273.

11 Maarten J. Raven, “Egyptian Concepts on the Orientation of the Human Body”, The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 91 (2005): 52. Como explica Raven, “Se pueden observar dos sistemas de orientación en conflicto. Los Hijos de Horus pueden ocupar posiciones de esquina en ataúdes o vasos canopos (Amset en el noreste, Hapi al noroeste, Duamutef al sureste y Qebehsenuf al suroeste; ambos pares cambian de lugar en el Imperio Nuevo), o están representados en las cuatro paredes laterales (Amset al sur, Hapi al norte, Duamutef al este y Qebehsenuef al oeste). En este último caso, las posiciones de las esquinas a menudo son tomadas por cuatro diosas protectoras. Obviamente, las nociones de los rincones del universo y de los cuatro puntos de la brújula no fueron distinguidas claramente”.

12 Raven, “Egyptian Concepts on the Orientation of the Human Body”, pág. 42. Véase también Hans Bonnet, Reallexikon der ägyptischen Religionsgeschichte (Berlín: de Gruyter, 1952), 315; Matthieu Heerma van Voss, “Horuskinder”, en Lexikon der Ägyptologie, ed. Wolfgang Helck y Eberhard Otto (Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 1980), 3:53.

13 The Epigraphic Survey, Medinet Habu, Volume 4: Festival Scenes of Ramses III (Chicago, IL.: University of Chicago Press, 1940), Pl. 213; traducción modificada de Gee, Notes on the Sons of Horus, pág. 60.

14 Hugh Nibley y Michael D. Rhodes, One Eternal Round (Salt Lake City y Provo, UT: Deseret Book y FARMS, 2010), 299–302; John Gee, “Hypocephali as Astronomical Documents”, en Aegyptus et Pannonia V: Acta Symposii anno 2008, ed. Hedvig Györy y Ádám Szabó (Budapest: The Ancient Egyptian Committee of the Hungarian-Egyptian Friendship Society, 2016), 59–71.

La vaca Hathor (facsímil 2, figura 5)

Perspectiva del Libro de Abraham #31

La figura 5 del Facsímile 2 del Libro de Abraham, es una figura de una vaca al revés, es identificada por José Smith con esta elaborada explicación:
Fig. 5. Se llama Enish-go-on-dosh en egipcio. Este también es uno de los planetas regentes, y los egipcios dicen que es el sol, y que recibe su luz de Kólob por conducto de Kae-e-vanrash, que es la magna Llave, o en otras palabras, el poder gobernante que rige a otros quince planetas o estrellas fijos, así como a Floeese, o sea, la luna, la tierra y el sol en sus revoluciones anuales. Este planeta recibe su poder por conducto de Kli-flos-is-es o Hah-ko-kau-beam, las estrellas, que en los números 22 y 23 se representan recibiendo luz de las revoluciones de Kólob.
Desde el punto de vista del conocimiento egiptológico actual, algunos aspectos de esta explicación encuentran confirmación plausible de los antiguos egipcios, mientras que otros aspectos siguen sin confirmarse1. Uno de los elementos de esta explicación que encuentra confirmación de los antiguos egipcios es la identificación de José Smith de esta figura como el sol2. La identidad de esta figura no siempre es fácil de establecer, ya que los antiguos egipcios representaban varias deidades y deidades compuestas con rasgos bovinos3, y porque no todos los hipocéfalos presentan consistentemente esta figura4. Sin embargo, esta figura afortunadamente aparece en hipocéfalos y es etiquetada con jeroglíficos con bastante frecuencia como para no hacer imposible su identificación. El nombre dado a esta figura en algunos hipocéfalos es el de la diosa Hathor (hwt-hr)5. Los nombres adicionales que a veces se le dan a esta figura son Ihet (ỉht/ȝht) y Mehet-Weret (mht-wrt), que son ambas diosas vacas "comúnmente identificadas con Isis o Hathor"6. Aunque esta figura no está etiquetada en el hipocéfalo reproducido como Facsímile 2, se puede asumir con certeza que es muy probable la diosa vaca Hathor o una de sus emanaciones divinas estrechamente asociadas. Una de las diosas "más importantes y populares" en el antiguo Egipto. Hathor asumió muchos roles y características en el curso de su adoración durante los tiempos prehistóricos en Egipto hasta el período romano alrededor de 3,000 años más tarde. "Ella era representada más comúnmente como una diosa vaca. Sus manifestaciones y actividades asociadas fueron numerosas y diversas, y aspectos complementarios como el amor y el odio, o la creación y la destrucción, la caracterizaron desde las primeras etapas de su adoración". Además, "Sus aspectos [también] incorporaron animales, vegetación, el cielo, el sol, árboles y minerales, y gobernó sobre los reinos del amor, el sexo y la fertilidad, al tiempo que mantenía un aspecto vengativo capaz de destruir a la humanidad". Cuando es representada como una vaca o como una hembra humana con cuernos de vaca, "generalmente lleva el disco solar entre [sus] cuernos"7. Este último detalle, aunque pequeño, es significativo para la interpretación de José Smith de esta figura. Hathor, especialmente en su forma bovina, se identifica con frecuencia en los textos egipcios como la madre y guardiana del disco solar, ya que renace cada mañana8. A veces se le identifica como la consorte y la hija de Ra, el dios del Sol, y con frecuencia también se le identifica como "Ojo de Ra". Ella destaca en un mito que involucra a Ra, dios del sol, en el que devora a los enemigos con un resplandor solar ardiente proveniente de su(s) ojo(s)9. Por consiguiente, es extensamente reconocido entre los egiptólogos que la diosa Hathor tenía una identidad solar inequívoca para los antiguos egipcios10. "Hathor estaba estrechamente relacionada con el dios del sol Ra cuyo disco lleva puesto", escribe Richard Wilkinson. "Por lo tanto, Hathor jugó un papel importante en los templos reales del sol del último Imperio Antiguo, y su relación mitológica con el dios del sol estaba firmemente establecida. Como la ‘Dorada’ era la diosa resplandeciente que acompañaba al dios sol en su viaje diario en la barca solar”11. Para el momento en el que probablemente el Facsímile 2 fue dibujado12, Hathor estaba siendo identificada por algunos antiguos egipcios no sólo como la madre y protectora del disco solar, sino como el propio sol. "Al igual que su compañero, el dios del sol Ra, Hathor [a veces se le identificaba como] una deidad solar ardiente"13. Una inscripción del Templo de Hathor en Dendera hace explícita esta identificación: "[La diosa] Keket que rinde homenaje a Hathor, Dama de la Iuneta: ‘Gloria a ti, Sol Femenino, Señora de los Soles’" (ỉnḏ ḥr.t rˁyt ḥnwt n(.t) rˁw)14. Comentando este texto, la egiptóloga Barbara Richter explica:
[E]l [juego de palabras] en la raíz , ‘sol‘, primero como el sustantivo femenino en singular rˁyt, ‘Sol Femenino’, y luego como el sustantivo plural rˁw, ‘soles‘, no sólo enfatiza que Hathor es el Sol, sino también que ella es la Señora de las otras deidades solares. Además, debido a que Keket [es una diosa que] representa la oscuridad [primordial], es apropiado que alabe a Hathor como el ‘Sol Femenino’, la portadora de luz. . . . [E]l texto, la iconografía y la simbología de [esta] escena [en el templo] aluden a Hathor como el sol naciente en su primera iluminación de la tierra15.
En el templo de Esna, esta figura de vaca en Facsímile 2 es identificada como Ihet y se describe de la siguiente manera:
La misma gran vaca, que da a luz a sus hijos a través de sus ritos, el guardián de sus casas que crea los dos rodeadores en su forma de la vaca dorada, el gran horizonte, que levanta las dos luces [el sol y la luna] en su vientre: ella ha expulsado las tinieblas y traído luz. Ella ha iluminado Egipto por lo que salió de ella. Ella es la madre divina de Ra [el dios del Sol], quien creó la luz a través de su creación, quien creó lo que existe después de su creación, quien causó que Orión navegara por el cielo del sur después de ella, quien selló el cazo en el cielo del norte ante ella. Ella es [la diosa del cielo] Nut que lleva las estrellas que pertenecen a ella con su órbita, que tiende el arco para que los decanos [estrellas] pisen en su lugar16
. Las imágenes en esta inscripción representan "una vaca dorada que lleva o crea dos cercadores (dbnyw) o dos grandes luces (hȝytỉ) que son el sol y la luna… Estos eliminan las tinieblas, traen la luz e iluminan la tierra. Ella también está conectada con las estrellas, fijándolas en sus lugares y órbitas… Ella está explícitamente conectada con el horizonte, pero al mismo tiempo, ya que "ella ha expulsado las tinieblas, y ha iluminado Egipto", es identificada con el sol. Así, esta figura es horizonte, cielo y sol”17. No hay nada obvio en la Figura 5 del Facsímile 2 que se preste a ser identificable como el sol para alguien que está especulando ociosamente sobre lo que podría significar. Así que, aunque actualmente no toda la explicación de José Smith de esta figura encuentra confirmación inmediata, el hecho de que al menos un elemento importante de su explicación encuentre confirmación de los antiguos egipcios indica que el Profeta estaba haciendo algo más que simplemente adivinar.

Lecturas adicionales

Hugh Nibley y Michael D. Rhodes, One Eternal Round (Salt Lake City y Provo, UT: Deseret Book y FARMS, 2010), 290–299.

Notas al pie de página

1 Michael D. Rhodes, “The Joseph Smith Hypocephalus…Twenty Years Later”, FARMS Preliminary Report (1997), 10–11; Hugh Nibley y Michael D. Rhodes, One Eternal Round (Salt Lake City y Provo, UT: Deseret Book y FARMS, 2010), 290–299.

2 John Gee, “Hypocephali as Astronomical Documents”, en Aegyptus et Pannonia V: Acta Symposii anno 2008, ed. Hedvig Györy y Ádám Szabó (Budapest: The Ancient Egyptian Committee of the Hungarian-Egyptian Friendship Society, 2016), 61–64; “Book of Abraham, Facsimiles Of”, en Pearl of Great Price Reference Companion, ed. Dennis L. Largey (Salt Lake City, UT: Deseret Book, 2017), 58.

3 Geraldine Pinch, Egyptian Mythology: A Guide to the Gods, Goddesses, and Traditions of Ancient Egypt (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2002), 123–126; Richard H. Wilkinson, Todos los dioses del Antiguo Egipto (Londres: Thames and Hudson, 2003), 170–175.

4 Tamás Mekis, Hypocephali, tesis doctoral. (Eötvös Loránd University, 2013), 1:90–91.

5 Mekis, Hypocephali, 1:90–91n479.

6 Pinch, Egyptian Mythology, 125, 137; Mekis, Hypocephali, 1:90–91n479, 103; Rhodes, “The Joseph Smith Hypocephalus…Twenty Years Later”, 10–11; Elena Pischikova, “‘Cow Statues’ in Private Tombs of Dynasty 26”, en Servant of Mut: Studies in Honor of Richard A. Fazzini, ed. Sue H. D’Auria (Leiden: Brill, 2008), 191.

7 Deborah Vischak, “Hathor”, en The Ancient Gods Speak: A Guide to Egyptian Religion, ed. Donald B. Redford (Nueva York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2002), 157.

8 Mekis, Hypocephali, 1:90–91n479, 96–97, 102–104.

9 François Daumas, “Hathor”, en Lexikon der Ägyptologie, ed. Wolfgang Helck y Eberhard Otto (Wiesbaden: Otto Harrassowitz, 1977), 2:1026.

10 Para un resumen representativo del consenso egiptológico, véase Pinch, Egyptian Mythology, 137–138.

11 Wilkinson, Todos los dioses del Antiguo Egipto, 140.

12 Es decir, el final del período persa o el período ptolemaico temprano. Mekis, Hypocephali, 2:122.

13 Alison Roberts, Hathor Rising: The Power of the Goddess in Ancient Egypt (Rochester, VT: Inner Traditions International, 1995), 8.

14 Barbara A. Richter, The Theology of Hathor of Dendera: Aural and Visual Scribal Techniques in the Per-Wer Sanctuary (Atlanta, GA: Lockwood Press, 2016), 167.

15 Richter, The Theology of Hathor of Dendera, 167.

16 Gee, “Hypocephali as Astronomical Documents”, 61.

17 Gee, “Hypocephali as Astronomical Documents”, 62.

Objetivo y función del hipocéfalo egipcio

Fac2

Perspectiva del Libro de Abraham #30

El facsímil 2 del Libro de Abraham es un tipo de documento llamado hipocéfalo. "El término hipocéfalo se refiere a una pieza de equipo funerario del Período Tardío y Ptolemaico [alrededor de los años 664-30 a. C.]. Concretamente, es un disco tipo amuleto hecho de cartonaje, bronce, textil, o rara vez de papiro e incluso de madera, emulando un disco solar1". El nombre fue acuñado por los egiptólogos modernos a partir de Jean-François Champollion y proviene del griego, que significa literalmente "debajo de la cabeza2". El hechizo 162 del antiguo Libro Egipcio de los Muertos especifica que estos amuletos debían colocarse en ẖr tp de la momia, que ha sido ampliamente representada como "debajo de la cabeza" de la momia. Una traducción técnicamente más correcta de la frase egipcia parece significar "en la cabeza" o "junto a la cabeza" de la momia, lo que significa al menos en alguna proximidad al difunto3. Hoy en día se conocen 158 hipocéfalos que han sido catalogados y/o publicados4. Basándose en su distribución cronológica y geográfica atestiguada, "está claro que el hipocéfalo [no] se convirtió en un objeto funerario generalizado" en el antiguo Egipto. En cambio, "seguían siendo piezas exclusivas de equipo funerario reservado para el alto clero y para los miembros de sus familias que ocupaban" puestos de alto rango en el templo, especialmente el templo de Amón en Karnak, el templo de Min en Ajmim, y el templo de Ptah en Menfis5. Aunque los hipocéfalos parecen ser creaciones posteriores, las concepciones mitológicas y cosmológicas contenidas en hipocéfalos tienen precursores aparentes en textos egipcios anteriores6 De acuerdo con el hechizo 162 del Libro de los Muertos, el hipocéfalo sirvió a una serie de propósitos importantes: proteger a los difuntos en el más allá, proporcionar luz y calor para los difuntos, hacer que los difuntos "aparecieran de nuevo como alguien que está en la tierra" (es decir, para resucitarlos) y en última instancia, transformar al difunto en un dios7. Los hipocéfalos también fueron diseñados (e incluso a veces explícitamente identificados como) del ojo mágico del dios del sol Ra que consumió a los enemigos con fuego. Su forma circular y su función para proporcionar luz, calor y protección naturalmente se dio a esta conceptualización en las mentes de los antiguos egipcios8.Si bien estos podrían haber sido quizás los propósitos primarios de el hipocéfalo, está claro por la rúbrica explicativa de algunas copias del hechizo 162 del Libro de los Muertos y por otra evidencia que ha sobrevivido, que también sirvieron roles no-funerarios. Por ejemplo, el hipocéfalo o los objetos que servían al mismo propósito que este, se utilizaron como dispositivos adivinatorios en el templo egipcio y como documentos astronómicos9. Esto es especialmente significativo ya que la interpretación de José Smith del Facsímil 2 establece conexiones con el templo y presenta varios elementos astronómicos. El hipocéfalo también compartió un vínculo conceptual con las puertas del templo. En esta función sirvieron, entre otras cosas, para mantener alejados a los enemigos y admitir amigos en el espacio sagrado y compartieron un enfoque en los motivos de la creación10. Una vez más, esto es similar a algunas de las explicaciones de José Smith del Facsímil 2 que enfatizan la creación. En resumen, mientras que el hipocéfalo sirvió a una serie de propósitos religiosos y rituales importantes para los antiguos egipcios, finalmente "apunta[n] hacia la esperanza de los egipcios en la resurrección y la vida después de la muerte como un ser divino11".Finalmente, es notable que parecen haber existido conexiones antiguas entre Abraham y el hipocéfalo. Por ejemplo, en un papiro egipcio Abraham se refiere como "la pupila del ojo de wedjat" y se asocia con el dios creador primigenio (PDM xiv. 150–231)12. "El hipocefalo, basado en las representaciones de [el dios creador] Amon en el panel central del disco, es, según la teoría del antiguo Egipto, idéntico a la pupila del ojode Horus13".Michael D. Rhodes también ha llamado la atención sobre una posible alusión al hipocéfalo en un texto extra-bíblico que destaca a Abraham.
El Apocalipsis de Abraham describe una visión que Abraham vio mientras hacía un sacrificio a Dios. En esta visión se le muestra el plan del universo, "lo que está en los cielos, en la tierra, en el mar y en el abismo" (casi las palabras exactas utilizadas en la parte media izquierda de la Hipocéfalo de Joseph Smith). Se le muestra "la plenitud del mundo entero y su círculo", en una imagen con dos lados. La similitud con el hipocéfalo es sorprendente. Incluso hay una descripción de lo que claramente son las cuatro figuras canópicas etiquetadas como número 6 en el Hipocéfalo de Joseph Smith. El significado de estos documentos es que datan del comienzo de la era cristiana, son aproximadamente contemporáneos con el hipocéfalo y los otros documentos egipcios comprados por José Smith, y relatan las mismas cosas sobre Abraham que José Smith dijo que se encuentran en el hipocefalo y los otros papiros egipcios14.Además de ser interesante e informativo por si mismo, entender el propósito y la función del antiguo hipocéfalo egipcio es por lo tanto crucial para evaluar la interpretación del Facsímil 2 de José Smith y ayudar a los lectores del Libro de Abraham a apreciar mejor por qué el Profeta podría haberse apropiado de tal documento para ilustrar el registro de Abraham.

Otras lecturas

John Gee, “Hypocephalus,” en The Pearl of Great Price Reference Companion, ed. Dennis L. Largey (Salt Lake City, UT: Deseret Book, 2017), 161–162. Hugh Nibley y Michael D. Rhodes, One Eternal Round (Salt Lake City y Provo, UT: Deseret Book y FARMS, 2010). Michael D. Rhodes, “The Joseph Smith Hypocephalus…Twenty Years Later”, FARMS Preliminary Report (1997).Michael D. Rhodes, “A Translation and Commentary of the Joseph Smith Hypocephalus”, BYU Studies 17, no. 3 (Spring 1977): 260–262.

Notas de pie de página

1 Tamás Mekis, Hypocephali, PhD dis. (Universidad Eötvös Loránd, 2013), 1:12, puntuación ligeramente alterada. También se han identificado otros objetos funerarios no redondos que cumplían un propósito igual o similar al del hipocéfalo en forma del "clásico" disco plano. Véase John Gee, “Non-Round Hypocephali”, en Aegyptus et Pannonia III: Acta Symposii anno 2004, ed. Hedvig Győry (Budapest: The Ancient Egyptian Committee of the Hungarian-Egyptian Friendship Society, 2006), 41–54.

2 Champollion usó esta designación basada en un papiro griego-egipcio bilingüe en el Louvre que ordenó que el texto se colocaraὕπο τὴν κεφαλήν (hypo tēn kephalēn) o "debajo de la cabeza". Jean-François Champollion, Notice desriptive des monuments Égyptiens du Musée du Charles X (París: L’Imprimerie De Crapelet, 1827), 155; Mekis, Hypocephali, 1:15n19.

3 Gee, “Non-Round Hypocephali”, 49–50.

4 Estos han sido recopilados amablemente en Mekis, Hypocephali.

5 Mekis, Hypocephali, 1:12.

6 Mekis, Hypocephali, 1:12.

7 Para una traducción accesible del hechizo 162, véase Michael D. Rhodes, “A Translation and Commentary of the Joseph Smith Hypocephalus”, BYU Studies 17, no. 3 (Spring 1977): 260–262; “The Joseph Smith Hypocephalus…Twenty Years Later”, FARMS Preliminary Report (1997), 13–14; cf. Hugh Nibley y Michael D. Rhodes, One Eternal Round (Salt Lake City y Provo, UT: Deseret Book y FARMS, 2010), 224–230; Mekis, Hypocephali, 1:13–15.

8 Mekis, Hypocephali, 1:57, 103–104; Rhodes, “The Joseph Smith Hypocephalus…Twenty Years Later”, 1.

9 Gee, “Non-Round Hypocephali,” 51–54; “Hypocephali as Astronomical Documents,” en Aegyptus et Pannonia V: Acta Symposii anno 2008, ed. Hedvig Györy y Ádám Szabó (Budapest: The Ancient Egyptian Committee of the Hungarian-Egyptian Friendship Society, 2016), 59–71.

10 John Gee, “Hypocephali as Gates”, de próxima publicación.

11 Rhodes, “The Joseph Smith Hypocephalus…Twenty Years Later”, 12.

12 F. L. Griffith y Herbert Thompson, The Demotic Magical Papyrus of London and Leiden (Oxford: The Claredon Press, 1921), 64–65; cf. John Gee, “Abraham in Ancient Egyptian Texts,” Ensign, July 1992, 61; “Abracadabra, Isaac, and Jacob,” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 7, no. 1 (1995): 76–79.

13 Mekis, Hypocephali, 1:14; cf. Nibley y Rhodes, One Eternal Round, 332-333.

14 Rhodes, “The Joseph Smith Hypocephalus…Twenty Years Later” 7; cf. Nibley y Rhodes, One Eternal Round, 352–355; Kevin L. Barney, “The Facsimiles and Semitic Adaptation of Existing Sources,” en Astronomy, Papyrus, and Covenant, ed. John Gee y Brian M. Hauglid (Provo, UT: FARMS, 2005), 121-122.

El Sacerdote Idólatra (Facsímil 1, figura 3)

Fac1Fig3

Perspectiva del Libro de Abraham #29

La explicación que acompaña a la Figura 3 del Facsímil 1 del Libro de Abraham lo identifica como “el sacerdote idólatra de Elkénah que intenta ofrecer a Abraham como sacrificio”. Para medir la validez de esta interpretación desde una perspectiva egiptológica, es necesario considerar varios factores.

La primera cuestión a resolver es la cuestión de las lagunas o piezas faltantes en el fragmento de papiro original. Tal como se publicó en la edición del 1 de marzo de 1842 del Times and Seasons, la Figura 3 se muestra como una figura de pie con la cabeza calva y un cuchillo desenvainado. Sin embargo, las áreas de la cabeza calva y el cuchillo en el fragmento del papiro original no están. En algún punto desconocido por alguna persona desconocida, se hizo un intento de llenar la cabeza faltante de la Figura 3, aunque no se hizo tal intento de llenar lo que falta en la mano de la figura. Es importante determinar si la figura en el papiro original está representada con precisión en el Facsímil 1, ya que puede afectar la interpretación de esta figura.

Una comparación lado a lado de la Figura 3 en el facsímil 1, a la derecha, y el fragmento de papiro original, a la izquierda. Imagen a través del sitio web de Joseph Smith Papers.

En primer lugar, está la pregunta de si el cuchillo que sostiene la Figura 3 podría haber estado plausiblemente en la viñeta o ilustración original. “La existencia del cuchillo ha sido puesta en duda por muchos porque no se ajusta a lo que otros papiros egipcios harían esperar “ 1, por lo que algunos egiptólogos han negado la posibilidad de que el cuchillo fuera original de esta ilustración (aunque otros no han puesto objeciones a la posibilidad) 2. Sin embargo, al menos dos testigos oculares diferentes del siglo XIX que examinaron los papiros, entre ellos uno que no era Santo de los Últimos Días, dijeron haber visto a “un sacerdote con un cuchillo en la mano” 3 o a “un hombre de pie junto a él con un cuchillo desenvainado” 4.La importancia de esto es que la presencia de un cuchillo en el papiro original “ha sido descrita por un testigo ocular no mormón cuya descripción del almacenamiento y la conservación de los papiros coincide con la de relatos contemporáneos independientes”. También coincide con la descripción que hizo [otro testigo presencial] antes de que Reuben Hedlock hiciera las xilografías de los facsímiles. Esto nos da dos testigos oculares independientes de la presencia de un cuchillo en el Facsímil 1, independientemente de lo que [de otra manera] podamos pensar”5. Por lo tanto, a pesar de nuestras suposiciones inconscientes o incluso conscientes sobre lo que creemos que debería estar en el papiro original, “no es válido argumentar que algo no existe porque no corresponde con lo que esperamos”6.Además, la forma de media luna del cuchillo en la mano de la Figura 3 es consistente con la forma de los cuchillos de pedernal del antiguo Egipto que se usaban desde tiempos prehistóricos hasta el Imperio Medio (y por lo tanto en la época de Abraham) en la “matanza ritual” y los ritos de execración, entre otras actividades7. Esto refuerza la probabilidad de que el cuchillo estuviera en la escena original.

El cuchillo del Facsímil 1 (abajo a la izquierda) coincide en su forma con los cuchillos de sílex recuperados (arriba a la izquierda) y con las representaciones de cuchillos de sílex (arriba a la derecha, abajo a la derecha) del Imperio Medio. Comenzando en la parte superior izquierda y en el sentido de las agujas del reloj, Imágenes a través de Petrie (1891), Pl. VII; Griffith (1896), Pls. VIII, IX; the Joseph Smith Papers website.

En segundo lugar, está la cuestión de si la figura 3 tenía originalmente una cabeza humana calva como la representada en el facsímil 1 o un tocado de chacal negro, como proponen varios egiptólogos8. Parece probable que la figura tuviera originalmente un tocado de chacal, ya que en el fragmento de papiro que se conserva pueden detectarse restos del tocado sobre el hombro izquierdo de la figura 3.

Los restos débiles de lo que parece haber sido el tocado de chacal de la figura 3 del facsímil 1.

Al considerar esto, entra en juego la cuestión de identificar la Figura 3. Algunos egiptólogos han identificado esta figura como un sacerdote9, mientras que otros han insistido en que se trata del dios Anubis10. Parece plausible que la figura sea Anubis debido a “la coloración negra de la piel” y a los débiles restos del tocado de chacal sobre el hombro izquierdo de la figura11. Sin embargo, sin una leyenda jeroglífica para esta figura12 esta identificación debe aceptarse con cautela, ya que Anubis no es la única figura con cabeza de chacal y piel negra atestiguada en la iconografía egipcia13.Además, la interrogante de si la figura es un sacerdote o el dios Anubis (u otro dios con cabeza de chacal), o si originalmente tenía una cabeza humana calva o una cabeza de chacal, parece ser una falsa dicotomía. “La práctica del enmascaramiento con fines rituales y ceremoniales parece haber sido importante en Egipto desde los primeros tiempos y continuó siendo un elemento de la práctica ritual en el período romano” 14, y “los suplantadores sacerdotales de Anubis aparecen regularmente en las ceremonias funerarias, y son llamados simplemente Inpw, ‘Anubis’ o rmt-Inpw, ‘hombres-Anubis’ . . . [o] ink Inpw, ‘Yo soy Anubis’”15. En el templo no funerario de Hathor de Deir el-Medineh hay una representación de un ritual tomada del capítulo 125 del Libro de los Muertos que muestra “al rey ofreciendo incienso, y a un sacerdote enmascarado como Anubis golpeando un tambor de marco redondo “16.

Una famosa imagen de un relieve del templo de Hathor en Dendera, a la izquierda, muestra en “falsa transparencia” a un sacerdote calvo con una máscara de Anubis que es ayudado por otro sacerdote en sus tareas rituales. Imagen de Sweeney (1993), 102. Un ejemplo real de este tipo de máscara, a la derecha, reside en el Pelizaeus-Museum en Hildesheim, en Alemania. Imagen a través de www.globalegyptianmuseum.org.

Asimismo, los frescos del yacimiento de Herculano representan “las ceremonias del culto a Isis tal y como se celebraban en Italia en el siglo I de nuestra era”17. En esta escena ritual aparecen varios sacerdotes y sacerdotisas, entre ellos una figura que se ha interpretado como el dios Osiris o como un sacerdote vestido como el dios Bes y disfrazado con una máscara. “Aunque la bailarina de Herculano probablemente representa a un participante enmascarado que se hace pasar por el dios, el asunto [habría sido] teológicamente poco importante” para los antiguos espectadores de esta escena, ya que el sacerdote “enmascarado como Bes” que realizaba el ritual habría asumido, a todos los efectos, la identidad del propio dios en esa capacidad ritual18.El egiptólogo John Gee ha explicado la importancia potencial de este hecho para el Facsímil 1:

Supongamos, en aras del argumento, que el encabezado de la figura 3 del facsímil 1 es correcto. ¿Cuáles son las implicaciones de que la figura sea un hombre calvo? El afeitado fue una característica común de la iniciación en el sacerdocio desde el Imperio Antiguo hasta el período romano. Dado que “el afeitado completo de la cabeza era otra marca del votante y sacerdote isíaco masculino”, la figura calva sería entonces un sacerdote. Supongamos, por otra parte, que la cabeza de la Figura 3 del facsímil 1 es la de un chacal. . . . Tenemos representaciones de sacerdotes que llevan máscaras, un ejemplo de una máscara real, relatos literarios de no egipcios sobre sacerdotes egipcios que llevan máscaras, e incluso un relato egipcio hasta ahora no reconocido sobre cuándo un sacerdote llevaría una máscara. En medio del ritual de embalsamamiento, se introduce una nueva sección con el siguiente pasaje: “Después, Anubis, el sacerdote estolita que lleva la cabeza de este dios, se sienta y ningún sacerdote lector se le acercará para atar las estolitas con trabajo alguno”. Por lo tanto, este texto resuelve cualquier duda sobre si se utilizaban realmente las máscaras. Además, identifica al individuo que lleva la máscara como un sacerdote. Por lo tanto, sea cual sea la restauración, el individuo que aparece en el Facsímil 1 Figura 3 es un sacerdote, y toda la cuestión de qué cabeza debería estar en la figura es discutible en lo que respecta a la identificación de la figura. Todo el debate ha sido un derroche de tinta19. La túnica de piel de leopardo que lleva la figura 3 también sería coherente con la identificación de esta figura como un sacerdote (concretamente una clase llamada semisacerdote), que es “reconocible por su túnica de piel de leopardo” y ciertos peinados. Curiosamente, y tal vez de manera significativa para la interpretación de José Smith del Facsímil 1, la vestimenta ritual del semisacerdote tenía una clara conexión con el dios Anubis derrotando al caos y al mal, personificado como el dios Seth, a través de la violencia. “El papiro Jumilhac, que data del periodo ptolemaico (ca. 300 a. C.), intenta explicar el significado de la piel de leopardo a través de un mito que relata las fechorías del dios Set. Según se cuenta en el papiro, Seth atacó a Osiris y luego se transformó en leopardo. El dios Anubis derrotó a Seth y luego marcó su piel con manchas, de ahí que la túnica conmemore la derrota de Seth “20. También en el Papiro Jumilhac, Anubis se transforma en una serpiente gigante que blande dos cuchillos de sílex21

Imagen de la tumba de época romana de Siamun en Gebel al-Mawta, en la que aparecen Siamun, sentado a la izquierda, su esposa, de pie, a la derecha, y su hijo como sacerdote con túnica y gorro de piel de leopardo. Imagen de Venit (2015), 142.

Aunque algunas “cuestiones relativas a la exactitud tanto de la obra de arte como de la copia [del Facsímil 1]” siguen sin respuesta por el momento (cuestiones que, por desgracia, “se ven empañadas habitualmente al trasladar la responsabilidad de la obra de arte del grabador, Reuben Hedlock, a José Smith, sin aportar ninguna prueba que identifique a un individuo concreto con la responsabilidad de las restauraciones”22), la identificación de esta figura como un sacerdote no está fuera del ámbito de lo posible desde una perspectiva egiptológica.

Otras lecturas

Hugh Nibley, An Approach to the Book of Abraham (Salt Lake City and Provo, UT: Deseret Book y FARMS, 2009), 287–296, 494–495.

John Gee, “Abracadabra, Isaac, and Jacob”, FARMS Review of Books 7, no. 1 (1995): 80–83.

Notas al pie de página

 

1 John Gee, “Eyewitness, Hearsay, and Physical Evidence of the Joseph Smith Papyri”, en The Disciple as Witness: Essays on Latter-day Saint History and Doctrine in Honor of Richard Lloyd Anderson, ed. Stephen D. Ricks, Donald W. Parry y Andrew H. Hedges (Provo, UT: FARMS, 2000), 186.

2 2 Sobre las opiniones egiptológicas contradictorias, véase Franklin S. Spalding, Joseph Smith, Jr., As a Translator (Salt Lake City, UT: Arrow Press, 1912), 30, y George R. Hughes in Hugh Nibley, An Approach to the Book of Abraham (Salt Lake City and Provo, UT: Deseret Book and FARMS, 2009), 144, que no veía nada desmesurado en la figura 3 sosteniendo un cuchillo; pero contrasta con Klaus Baer, “The Breathing Permit of Hôr: A Translation of the Apparent Source of the Book of Abraham”, Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 3, no. 3 (Autumn 1968): 118n34; Stephen E. Thompson, “Egyptology and the Book of Abraham”, Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 28, no. 1 (1995): 148–149; Lanny Bell, “The Ancient Egyptian ‘Books of Breathing’, the Mormon ‘Book of Abraham’, and the Development of Egyptology in America,” en Egypt and Beyond: Essays Presented to Leonard H. Lesko upon his Retirement from the Wilbour Chair of Egyptology at Brown University June 2005, ed. Stephen E. Thompson y Peter der Manuelian (Providence, RI: Brown University Press, 2008), 25n27, 30.

3 William I. Appleby journal, 5 May 1841, reimpreso en Brian M. Hauglid, ed., A Textual History of the Book of Abraham: Manuscripts and Editions (Provo, UT: The Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship, 2010), 278–282, cita en 279, línea 7.

4 Henry Caswall, The City of the Mormons; or, Three Days at Nauvoo, in 1842 (London: Rivington, 1842), 23.

5 Gee, “Eyewitness, Hearsay, and Physical Evidence of the Joseph Smith Papyri”, 186.

6 Gee, “Eyewitness, Hearsay, and Physical Evidence of the Joseph Smith Papyri”, 208n38.

7 Robert K. Ritner, The Mechanics of Ancient Egyptian Magical Practice (Chicago, Ill.: Oriental Institute, 1993), 163, véase además 163–167; Marquardt Lund, “Egyptian Depictions of Flintknapping from the Old and Middle Kingdom, in Light of Experiments and Experience”, en Egyptology in the Present: Experiential and Experimental Methods in Archaeology, ed. Carolyn Graves-Brown (Swansea: Classical Press of Wales, 2015), 113–137; Carolyn Graves-Brown, “Flint and Forts: The Role of Flint in Late Middle-New Kingdom Egyptian Weaponry”, en Walls of the Prince: Egyptian Interactions with Southwest Asia in Antiquity: Essays in Honour of John S. Holladay, Jr., ed. Timothy P. Harrison, Edward B. Banning y Stanley Klassen (Leiden: Brill, 2015), 37–59; William M. Flinders Petrie, Illahun, Kahun and Gurob: 1889–1890 (London: David Nutt, 1891) 52–53, Pl. VII; F. Ll. Griffith, Beni Hasan, Part III (London: Egypt Exploration Fund, 1896), 33–38, Pls. VII–X.

8 Théodule Devéria in Jules Remy, Voyage au pays des Mormons (Paris: E. Dentu, 1860), 2:463; Bell, “The Ancient Egyptian ‘Books of Breathing,’ the Mormon ‘Book of Abraham’, and the Development of Egyptology in America”, 30.

9 James H. Breasted, Friedrich Freiherr von Bissing y Edward Meyer in Spalding, Joseph Smith, Jr., As a Translator, 26, 30; George R. Hughes in Nibley, An Approach to the Book of Abraham, 144; John Gee, “Abracadabra, Isaac, and Jacob”, FARMS Review of Books 7, no. 1 (1995): 80–83; Nibley, An Approach to the Book of Abraham, 34, 288, 494–495.

10 Devéria in Jules Remy, Voyage au pays des Mormons, 2:463; William Flinders Petrie in Spalding, Joseph Smith, Jr., As a Translator, 23; Baer, “The Breathing Permit of Hôr”, 118; Thompson, “Egyptology and the Book of Abraham”, 114; Michael D. Rhodes, The Hor Book of Breathings: A Translation and Commentary (Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 2002), 18; Bell, “The Ancient Egyptian ‘Books of Breathing’, the Mormon ‘Book of Abraham’, and the Development of Egyptology in America”, 23.

11 Rhodes, The Hor Book of Breathings, 18.

12 Parece que había una leyenda jeroglífica sobre el brazo de la figura 3 en la viñeta original conservada en el Facsímil 1, pero está demasiado dañada para leerla.

13 Como se señala en Gee, “Eyewitness, Hearsay, and Physical Evidence of the Joseph Smith Papyri”, 208n38, la figura podría ser el dios con cabeza de chacal Isdes (que, por cierto, empuña un cuchillo). Véase Christian Leitz, Lexikon der ägyptischen Götter und Götterbezeichnungen (Lovaina: Peeters, 2002), 1:560-561, y además Diletta Dantoni, Il Dio Isdes (tesis de licenciatura, Universidad de Bolonia, 2014), 8-9, sobre la identidad del dios Isdes como juez y castigador de los muertos.

14 Penelope Wilson, “Masking and Multiple Personas”, en Ancient Egyptian Demonology: Studies on the Boundaries Between the Demonic and the Divine in Egyptian Magic, ed. P. Kousoulis (Leuven: Peeters, 2011), 77.

15 Ritner, The Mechanics of Ancient Egyptian Magical Practice, 249n1142; cf. Wilson, “Masking and Multiple Personas”, 78–79.

16 Alexandra von Lieven, “Book of the Dead, Book of the Living: BD Spells as Temple Texts”, The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 98 (2012): 263.

17 Robert K. Ritner, “Osiris-Canopus and Bes at Herculaneum”, en Joyful in Thebes: Egyptological Studies in Honor of Betsy M. Bryan, ed. Richard Jasnow y Kathlyn M. Cooney (Atlanta, GA: Lockwood Press, 2015), 401.

18 Ritner, “Osiris-Canopus and Bes at Herculaneum”, 406; cf. Wilson, “Masking and Multiple Personas”, 79-82, que habla del uso de las máscaras en los rituales y en los juegos de rol y de lo que eso pudo significar para los antiguos egipcios.

19 Gee, “Abracadabra, Isaac, and Jacob”, 80–83, citas eliminadas; cf. A Guide to the Joseph Smith Papyri (Provo, UT: FARMS, 2000), 36–39, citas internas eliminadas; Michael D. Rhodes, “Teaching the Book of Abraham Facsimiles”, Religious Educator 4, no. 2 (2003): 120; Nibley, An Approach to the Book of Abraham, 34, 288, 494–495; Günther Roeder, Die Denkmäler des Pelizaeus-Museums zu Hildesheim (Hildesheim: Karl Curtius Verlag, 1921), 127, Pl. 49; Deborah Sweeney, “Egyptian Masks in Motion”, Göttinger Miszellen 135 (1993): 101–104.

20 Emily Teeter, Religion and Ritual in Ancient Egypt (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011), 24–25.

21 P. Jumilhac 13/14-14/4, in Jacques Vandier, Le Papyrus Jumilhac (Paris: Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1962), 125–126.

22 Gee, A Guide to the Joseph Smith Papyri, 39.

Facsímile 1, vista como una escena de sacrificio

Fac1

Perspectiva del Libro de Abraham #28

El facsímile 1 del Libro de Abraham describe visualmente la narración contenida en Abraham 1:12-19. Según la interpretación de José Smith, esta escena muestra a Abraham atado sobre un altar ante algunos dioses idólatras. Un sacerdote idólatra está a punto de sacrificar a Abraham, quien cuenta con la protección del ángel del Señor.Desde mediados del siglo XIX, cuando los egiptólogos comenzaron a analizar los facsímiles del Libro de Abraham, la interpretación de José Smith de esta escena (a veces llamada escena del sofá de león, debido al prominente sofá en forma de león en el centro de las representaciones) difiere de las interpretaciones egiptológicas. En 1860, el egiptólogo francés Théodule Devéria interpretó el facsímile 1 como una representación de la resurrección del dios Osiris1. En 1912, los egiptólogos interpretaron el facsímile 1 de diversas maneras como: “[L]a conocida escena de Anubis preparando el cuerpo de un hombre muerto”2, “una escena de resurrección” mostrando a “Osiris resucitando de entre los muertos”3, “un embalsamador preparando un cuerpo para el entierro”4, “el cuerpo del muerto que yace” sobre un ataúd5 y “un hombre muerto […] acostado sobre un féretro” y siendo preparado para la momificación6. En años más recientes se han dado interpretaciones similares del facsímile 17.

Debido a la importancia de esta autoridad egiptológica, puede parecer absurdo asociar el facsímile 1 con un sacrificio tal como lo hizo José Smith. Sin embargo, una investigación más reciente ha encontrado evidencia que sugiere una conexión entre el sacrificio o la violencia sagrada y las escenas de embalsamamiento y la resurrección del difunto (o el dios Osiris). En 2008 y 2010, el egiptólogo John Gee publicó pruebas que vinculaban las escenas de momificación y resurrección de Osiris “en los altares del techo del templo de Dendera” con rituales de execración que implicaban el uso de violencia en los ritos8. Otros egiptólogos ya han establecido paralelismos entre el facsímile 1 y las escenas del sofá de león del templo de Dendera 9, pero como ha explicado Gee, existe una clara conexión con el sacrificio y la violencia en los rituales en estas escenas10. “En los textos de Dendera, la palabra para sofá de león […] es homófona o idéntica a la palabra […] ‘matadero, desolladero’, así como para el término ‘sacrificios'”11. Esto se refuerza en las inscripciones que rodean las escenas de sofá de león.

La palabra egipcia para “sofá de león” (nmỉt; arriba) es homófona o casi homófona con las palabras para “desolladero” (nmt; abajo a la izquierda) y “sacrificio” (nmt; abajo a la derecha). Debido a su ortografía similar y a su probable pronunciación, estos términos parecen haber sido asociados conceptualmente entre sí en algunos contextos a través de la paranomasia o el juego de palabras, lo cual era muy frecuente entre los antiguos egipcios. Jeroglíficos replicados por Wilson (1997).

Por ejemplo, en la escena central de la capilla oriental, podemos leer: “Él no existirá ni existirá su nombre, ya que destruirás su ciudad, derribarás los muros de su casa y todos los que estén en ella serán prendidos en llamas, demolerás su distrito, apuñalarás a sus confederados, su carne será cenizas, el malvado conspirador será consignado al sofá de león/matadero, de esta manera él ya no existirá”… Además, en la misma capilla, tenemos representaciones de Anubis y los hijos de Horus (probablemente las figuras debajo del sofá de león en el facsímile 1) sosteniendo cuchillos. Aquí, Anubis se identifica como el “que golpea a los adversarios con su fuerza, ya que tiene el cuchillo en la mano, para expulsar al que camina por la transgresión; yo soy el violento que salió de dios, después de haber cortado la cabeza de los confederados de aquel cuyo nombre es maligno”. El hijo de Horus, con cabeza humana, lleva su nombre arriba de su cabeza que lo identifica como “el que expulsa a los enemigos” y “que viene destrozando a los enemigos que masacra a los pecadores”. El hijo de Horus con cabeza de babuino dice: “He matado a los que crean injurias en la casa de Dios en su presencia; les quito el aliento de la nariz”. El hijo de Horus con cabeza de chacal dice: “Hago retroceder a los extranjeros hostiles”. Finalmente, el hijo de Horus con cabeza de halcón dice: “He eliminado la rebelión”12.

La escena central de la capilla oriental más recóndita de Osiris en el templo de Dendera representa la momificación y revitalización de Osiris. Aunque no están replicados aquí, los jeroglíficos que se encuentran en las columnas justo encima de Osiris en el centro de la escena aluden, en parte, a la matanza de los enemigos del dios. Dibujo lineal tomado de Cauville (1997).

De esta y otras pruebas recopiladas por Gee13, se puede ver que, al menos, algunos antiguos egipcios “asocia[ban] la escena del sofá de león con la de los sacrificios de los enemigos”14. ¿Por qué podrían haberlo hecho algunos antiguos egipcios? Puede que esté relacionado con el mito de la resurrección del dios Osiris, que las escenas del sofá del león pretendían representar. En la versión clásica del mito, Osiris fue asesinado y mutilado por su perverso hermano Set. Gracias al esfuerzo de Isis, su esposa y hermana, el cuerpo de Osiris fue mágicamente reconstruido y resucitado. La reivindicación final llegó cuando su hijo Horus acabó con Set en combate y reclamó la realeza15. El elemento en este mito de Horus matando a Set y, por lo tanto, las fuerzas del caos o el desorden (incluidos los pueblos extranjeros, rebeldes y enemigos del faraón) podría explicar por qué el sacrificio se asociaba con el embalsamamiento y la momificación en algunos textos del antiguo Egipto16.

Curiosamente, otro papiro del siglo I a. C. (no muy alejado del período de tiempo de los papiros de José Smith), “comenta el destino sufrido en el lugar de embalsamamiento durante las etapas iniciales de momificación por alguien que estaba demasiado preocupado por acumular riqueza en vida”17. Como se lee en el texto: “Es el jefe de los espíritus (= Anubis) el primero en castigar tras tomar el aliento. El aceite de enebro, el incienso, el natrón y la sal, ingredientes abrasadores son un ‘remedio’ para sus heridas. Un ‘amigo’ que no tiene piedad ataca su carne. Es incapaz de decir “desiste” durante el castigo del consejero”18. Al comentar sobre este pasaje, Mark Smith observa que en este texto “la mesa de embalsamamiento [el sofá de león] es también un tribunal del juez y el embalsamador principal, Anubis, sirve como juez que ejecuta la sentencia. Para el hombre inicuo, la momificación, el mismo proceso que se supone que restablece la vida y concede la inmortalidad, se convierte en una forma de tortura de la que no es posible escapar”19. De hecho, que Anubis tuviera un papel como juez de los muertos, además de ser únicamente un embalsamador, ha sido reconocido previamente por los egiptólogos20.

 

Los hijos de Horus sosteniendo cuchillos mientras proclaman su intención de acabar con los enemigos de Osiris en la capilla del dios en el templo de Dendera. Dibujo lineal tomado de Cauville (1997).

Una tarea que cumplía Anubis con esta función, era la de guardia o protector que “administra[ba] horribles castigos a los enemigos de Osiris”21. A partir de las pruebas que se conservan, es evidente que “Anubis debió dedicarse a alejar las influencias del mal, y es concebible que lo hiciera como juez… [Incluso, un texto egipcio] identifica a Anubis como un carnicero que mata a los enemigos de Osiris, mientras que [otro] afirma que esos carniceros son en realidad una compañía de jueces”22. Como “contador de corazones” (ỉp ỉbw) Anubis era “el que infligía el castigo […] de los enemigos” de Osiris23. Así pues, desde la perspectiva de los antiguos egipcios, el proceso de embalsamamiento y momificación incluía elementos de violencia en los rituales contra los malhechores o agentes del caos. “El castigo de los enemigos por parte de un ‘juez’ es simplemente una parte del ritual de protección decretado en relación con el embalsamamiento del difunto”24.

Por lo tanto, es razonable insistir, como lo hace Gee, en que “excluir un aspecto de sacrificio de las escenas del sofá de león no es egipcio, incluso si no podemos llegar a una interpretación definitiva [del facsímile 1] en este momento”25.

Otras lecturas

John Gee, “The Facsimiles”, en An Introduction to the Book of Abraham (Salt Lake City y Provo, UT: Deseret Book y Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2017), 143–156.

John Gee, “Some Puzzles from the Joseph Smith Papyri”, FARMS Review 20, no. 1 (2008): 113–137, esp. 130-135.

Hugh Nibley, “Facsimile 1: A Unique Document”, en An Approach to the Book of Abraham (Provo, UT: FARMS, 2009), 115–178.

Notas al pie de página

 

1 Jules Remy, Voyage au pays des Mormons, 2 vols. (Paris: E. Dentu, 1860), 2:463; cf. A Journal to the Great-Salt-Lake City, 2 vols. (London: W. Jeffs, 1861), 2:540.

2 Franklin S. Spalding, Joseph Smith, Jr., As a Translator (Salt Lake City, UT: The Arrow Press, 1912), pág. 23.

3 Spalding, Joseph Smith, Jr., As a Translator, pág. 26.

4 Spalding, Joseph Smith, Jr., As a Translator, pág. 28.

5 Spalding, Joseph Smith, Jr., As a Translator, pág. 30.

6 Spalding, Joseph Smith, Jr., As a Translator, pág. 30.

7 Véase, por ejemplo, Michael D. Rhodes, The Hor Book of Breathings: A Translation and Commentary (Provo, UT: FARMS, 2002), págs. 18-20.

8 John Gee, “Some Puzzles from the Joseph Smith Papyri”, FARMS Review 20, no. 1 (2008): 130–135, cita en pág. 132; “Execration Rituals in Various Temples”, en la pág. 8. Ägyptologische Tempeltagung: Interconnections between Temples, Warschau, págs. 22–25. septiembre de 2008, ed. Monika Dolińska y Horst Beinlich (Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2010), págs. 67–80, esp. págs. 73–79.

9 Lanny Bell, “The Ancient Egyptian ‘Books of Breathing’, the Mormon ‘Book of Abraham’, and the Development of Egyptology in America”, en Egypt and Beyond: Essays Presented to Leonard H. Lesko upon his Retirement from the Wilbour Chair of Egyptology at Brown University, June 2005, ed. Stephen E. Thompson y Peter Der Manuelian (Providence, RI: Brown University Press, 2008), págs. 26–28.

10 Gee, “Execration Rituals in Various Temples”, págs. 73–79.

11 Gee, “Some Puzzles from the Joseph Smith Papyri”, pág. 132, citando a Penelope Wilson, A Ptolemaic Lexikon (Leuven: Peeters, 1997).

12 Gee, “Some Puzzles from the Joseph Smith Papyri”, págs. 132–133, citando a Sylvie Cauville, Le Temple de Dendara: Les chapelles osiriennes (Cairo: IFAO, 1997); cf. John Gee, “Glossed Over: Ancient Egyptian Interpretations of Their Religion”, en Evolving Egypt: Innovation, Appropriation, and Reinterpretation in Ancient Egypt, ed. Kerry Muhlestein (Oxford: Archaeopress, 2012), pág.74. Cauville, Le Temple de Dendara, 2:107, nombra a estas figuras que defienden a Osiris como “genios agresivos” (les génies agressifs) que forman una “zona defensiva” (zone de défense) alrededor de su cuerpo.

13 Gee, “Some Puzzles from the Joseph Smith Papyri”, págs. 134–135.

14 Gee, “Some Puzzles from the Joseph Smith Papyri”, pág. 134.

15 Geraldine Pinch, Egyptian Mythology: A Guide to the Gods, Goddesses, and Traditions of Ancient Egypt (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2002), págs. 193–194; cf. A. M. Blackman y H. W. Fairman, “The Myth of Horus at Edfu: II. C. The Triumph of Horus over His Enemies: A Sacred Drama”, The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 28 (1942): 32–38; “The Myth of Horus at Edfu: II. C. The Triumph of Horus over His Enemies: A Sacred Drama (Continued)”, The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 29 (1943): 2–36; “The Myth of Horus at Edfu: II. C. The Triumph of Horus over His Enemies: A Sacred Drama (Concluded)”, The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 30 (1944): 5–22.

16 Esta conexión se establece explícitamente en el Papiro Jumilhac. Véase Harco Willems, “Anubis as Judge”, en Egyptian Religion: The Last Thousand Years, Part 1: Studies Dedicated to the Memory of Jan Quaegebeur, ed. Willy Clarysse, Antoon Schoors y Harco Willems (Leuven: Peeters, 1998), pág. 741.

17 Mark S. Smith, Traversing Eternity: Texts for the Afterlife from Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2009), pág. 26.

18 Smith, Traversing Eternity, págs. 26–27.

19 Smith, Traversing Eternity, pág. 27.

20 Willems, “Anubis as Judge”, págs. 719–743.

21 Willems, “Anubis as Judge”, pág. 726.

22 Willems, “Anubis as Judge”, pág. 727.

23 Willems, “Anubis as Judge”, pág. 735.

24 Willems, “Anubis as Judge”, pág. 740; cf. Cauville, Le Temple de Dendara, 2:108, que señala que en estas escenas de embalsamiento en Dendera el papel de Anubis es actuar tanto como embalsamador y carnicero de los enemigos de Osiris. “Cette double fonction est aussi assumée par les trois Anubis: préposés à l’embaumement (ḫnty sḥ-nṯr, nb wˁbt, ỉmỉ-wt), ils massacrent Seth et le découpent en morceaux” [“Esta doble función la asumen también los tres Anubis: encargados de embalsamar (ḫnty sḥ-nṯr, nb wˁbt, ỉmỉ-wt), sacrifican a Set y lo cortan en pedazos”].

25 Gee, “Some Puzzles from the Joseph Smith Papyri”, pág. 135.